About Dancers and Those Who Do Not Dance

Some people dance.
“At nine o’clock in the evening the military band was playing in the street before the club, while in the club itself the officers were dancing with the ladies of K—-. The ladies felt as though they were on wings. Intoxicated by the dancing, the music, and the clank of spurs, they threw themselves heart and soul into making the acquaintance of their new partners, and quite forgot their old civilian friends.”

Others do not even try to dance. They indulge themselves with malice.
“Their fathers and husbands, forced temporarily into the background, crowded round the meagre refreshment table in the entrance hall. All these government cashiers, secretaries, clerks, and superintendents — stale, sickly looking, clumsy figures — were perfectly well aware of their inferiority. They did not even enter the ball-room, but contented themselves with watching their wives and daughters in the distance dancing with the accomplished and graceful officers.

Among the husbands was Shalikov, the tax-collector – a narrow, spiteful soul, given to drink, with a big, closely cropped head, and thick, protruding lips. He had had a university education; there had been a time when he used to read progressive literature and sing students’ songs, but now, as he said of himself, he was a tax-collector and nothing more.

He stood leaning against the doorpost, his eyes fixed on his wife, Anna Pavlovna, a little brunette of thirty, with a long nose and a pointed chin. Tightly laced, with her face carefully powdered, she danced without pausing for breath – danced till she was ready to drop exhausted. But though she was exhausted in body, her spirit was inexhaustible.”

“The tax-collector watched, scowling with spite. . . .

It was not jealousy he was feeling. He was ill-humoured – first, because the room was taken up with dancing and there was nowhere he could play a game of cards; secondly, because he could not endure the sound of wind instruments; and, thirdly, because he fancied the officers treated the civilians somewhat too casually and disdainfully. But what above everything revolted him and moved him to indignation was the expression of happiness on his wife’s face.

‘It makes me sick to look at her!’ he muttered. ‘Going on for forty, and nothing to boast of at any time, and she must powder her face and lace herself up! And frizzing her hair! Flirting and making faces, and fancying she’s doing the thing in style! Ugh! you’re a pretty figure, upon my soul!’

Anna Pavlovna was so lost in the dance that she did not once glance at her husband.

‘Of course not! Where do we poor country bumpkins come in!’ sneered the tax-collector.

‘We are at a discount now. . . . We’re clumsy seals, unpolished provincial bears, and she’s the queen of the ball! She has kept enough of her looks to please even officers. . . They’d not object to making love to her, I dare say!’

During the mazurka the tax-collector’s face twitched with spite. A black-haired officer with prominent eyes and Tartar cheekbones danced the mazurka with Anna Pavlovna. Assuming a stern expression, he worked his legs with gravity and feeling, and so crooked his knees that he looked like a jack-a-dandy pulled by strings, while Anna Pavlovna, pale and thrilled, bending her figure languidly and turning her eyes up, tried to look as though she scarcely touched the floor, and evidently felt herself that she was not on earth, not at the local club, but somewhere far, far away — in the clouds. Not only her face but her whole figure was expressive of beatitude. . . . The tax-collector could endure it no longer; he felt a desire to jeer at that beatitude, to make Anna Pavlovna feel that she had forgotten herself, that life was by no means so delightful as she fancied now in her excitement. . . .

‘You wait; I’ll teach you to smile so blissfully,” he muttered. “You are not a boarding-school miss, you are not a girl. An old fright ought to realise she is a fright!’

Petty feelings of envy, vexation, wounded vanity, of that small, provincial misanthropy engendered in petty officials by vodka and a sedentary life, swarmed in his heart like mice.”
The Husband by Anton Chekhov

 

 

 

 

 

 

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5 thoughts on “About Dancers and Those Who Do Not Dance

    1. oleanderia Post author

      Probably intuition tells you that the dance is most important in life. Dancing metaphorically understood, of course. Your comment reminds me the novel ‘Dance, Dance, Dance’ by Haruki Murakami. One of the heroes says that we must dance. We cannot stop. Often everything seems to be a mistake and that is why people are stopping. But we must dance, even if it will seem so silly. We must dance to soften what became hardened in us.

      Reply

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